By the end of 2020, Museum has mounted three educational programmes as part of the ‘Complex health promotion and disease prevention measures’ project (Nr. 9.2.4.1/16/I/001) financed by the European Social Fund.

Educational programme ‘The Effect of Alcohol on the Adolescent Body’. 

The programme aims to raise awareness of the impact that alcohol has on the human body, presenting the issue through a historical lens and helping, among other things, understand the potential risk of alcohol addiction for a young organism and encourage school-age children and teenagers to choose a healthy harm-free lifestyle.

Venue: Permanent exhibition of Pauls Stradiņš Museum of the History of Medicine, Riga, Antonijas iela 1.

Target audience: 7th‒12th grade students.

Educational programme ‘Your Healthy Nutrition’ 

The programme aims to raise awareness of the significance of healthy daily nutrition, presenting the issue through a historical lens, and encourage adhering to the principles of healthy diet in everyday life.

Venue: Permanent exhibition of the Latvian Museum of Pharmacy, Riga, 13 Riharda Vāgnera iela 13.

Target audience: 5th‒8th grade students.

Educational programme ‘Sexual and Reproductive Health’ 

The programme aims to increase students’ knowledge and promote skills in the sexual and reproductive health area, encourage building respectful and responsible relationships. The objectives of the programme include raising awareness of the significance of sexual and reproductive health in human life, the role of responsible relationships in sexual and reproductive health, use of contraception, the risks of sexually transmissive diseases and importance of disease prevention, as well as the medical and social aspects of abortion.

Venue: The ‘Sexual and Reproductive Health’ exhibition at Pauls Stradiņš Museum of the History of Medicine, Riga, Antonijas iela 1.

Target audience: 9th‒12th grade students. 

Vm Esf Lv Korigets 1

Esf Cover
Model of a GAZ-22D ambulance car produced in Gorky car factory. Leningrad (Saint Petersburg), 1960s
FacebookTwitter

In the first live broadcast of the discussion cycle “MVM Talks. Is it easy to be healthy? Health Behaviour and Health (In)equality in Latvia” Anna Žabicka, a social anthropologist and chair of the discussion, will focus on the factors that affect people’s health behavior, health condition and equal opportunities for health care. It is much more difficult to be “healthy” or one who follows the recommendations of a healthy lifestyle, performs regular routine examinations and follows the instructions of health care professionals in conditions with limited financial means, socio-economic insecurity, lack of social and psychological support, limited job opportunities, responsibility for other relatives, as well as complicated relationships with doctors or unpleasant previous experiences. What social problems and inequalities do family doctors see in their practices and how do these affect a person’s health and chances of being healthy? What are people doing and can do by themselves to take care of their health on a daily basis?

MVM talks will be led by social anthropologist Anna Žabicka. The guests of this first conversation are social policy expert Ruta Zilvere and family doctor Linda Šīrone. Ruta Zilvere is an independent social policy expert with long experience in the Ministry of Welfare in the development of policies and legislation, as well as in the establishment of administrative structures and procedures. Linda Šīrone is a family doctor in Liepāja and the head of LLC “Liepājas ģimenes veselības centrs”.

The recording of the conversation can be watched on the museum’s Youtube channel here (in Latvian)!

About “MVM Talks”

Starting from 13 May, MVM offers a cycle of conversations on health, which will be led by social anthropologist Anna Žabicka. The cycle speaks of health as a pluralistic experience and reality. How to understand this? “The body, the patient, the disease, the doctor, the technician, the technology: af all there is more than just one,” writes philosopher Annemarie Mol. Even when the diagnosis is the same, as a patient with a diagnosis X, I am a completely different patient for one specialist than for another. Manifestations of the body, of disease and health, their course, representation, and experience are a multi-faceted, multi-layered and flowing reality, the formation involves a set of many changing factors. My health changes from day to day, from environment to environment, it encounters everything that is around me and lives with what is already in me. As a human being, I too am in a constant relationship with “more than the human world,” meaning other living beings, the inanimate nature, the man-made environment, technology and physical, political, social, and mental structures, as well as our fellow human beings.

In this MVM conversation cycle, together with medical and social science experts and professionals, we will talk about the human being and their health, trying to see it and cover it on a much wider scale than the “norm” which does not require medical intervention. In six talks, we will address issues such as health inequalities in Latvia, the place of people who use drugs in society and their access to health care, the impact of the urban environment on health behavior, food and food chains, as well as loneliness and sexual health and sexuality. At the heart of the conversation is the human being – one’s relationship with oneself, with the environment, time, space and socio-political structure – and the health we experience.

About the host

MVM talks will be led by social anthropologist Anna Žabicka. Anna is currently writing a dissertation on aging and care in the Latvian countryside, based on a long-term ethnographic study in a small Latvian rural nursing home. Anna specializes in medical anthropology, with a special academic interest in aging, care, health and social inequality, death and kinship. She holds master’s degrees in social anthropology from Wayne State University in the United States and Riga Stradins University (2014) . She is currently pursuing a doctorate at the University of Vienna (Universität Wien) and teaches Anthropology of Medicine, Death and Kinship at Riga Stradins University.

Mvm Sarunas Prieksmets—1
Full class lottery ticket for the Latvian Red Cross three-stage lottery No.21 in Riga, October 1930
FacebookTwitter

At 18.00 in the garden or the conference hall of the Medicine History Museum.

Participation in the workshop is free of charge by registering on the website here or by phone 26644548.

Have you ever paid attention to where the strawberries come from when you put them in your shopping trolley in winter? How is it possible that you can find a variety of exotic fruits in the store all year round? How far have they travelled to Latvia? Do you know what vegetables, fruits and berries are typical for each season in Latvia?

The workshop will be led by nutritionist Veronika Avdejeva who will invite you to find out what sustainable nutrition means – what impact our diet and shopping habits have on the environment and what the benefits of choosing seasonal and local products are. Participants will be able to test their knowledge in a practical way, both by tasting lesser-known local vegetables, and by testing their own skills to grow something healthy at home on the windowsill.

Veronika Avdejeva is a nutritionist. Educated at Riga Stradiņš University. On a daily basis, Veronika conducts nutrition classes and master classes for both children and adults and continues to study nutrition for a master’s degree.

The class will be held in Latvian. The number of participants in the workshops is limited. The event will be photographed and the photos taken during it will be published in the post about the event on the internet as well as used for publicity of the project.

Workshop attendees, except for children under 12 years of age, must present a COVID certificate confirming vaccination or recovery from Covid-19, or a negative test result.

Classes are organised by Pauls Stradiņš Medicine History Museum in cooperation with SIA “OnPlate”. “MHM nutrition workshops for families” are implemented by European Social Fund project No. 9.2.4.1/16/I/001 “Complex health promotion and disease prevention measures”.


Vm Esf Lv Korigets
Darbnica—1—plakatswww
FacebookTwitter

The second conversation of the MHM series, ‘Healthy city: Creating environment where moving is easy and cool’, takes place on 17 August 2021 at 18:00 at Pauls Stradiņš Museum of the History of Medicine, live streamed on the museum’s Facebook account. In this conversation, social anthropologist Anna Žabicka, architect and social anthropologist Matīss Šteinerts and President of the Latvian Street Workout and Calisthenics Federation Rolands Kikors will share their thoughts on an urban environment that would promote physical activity and diminish the impact of social inequity.

Just like healthy eating promotion drives, social campaigns for active lifestyle often focus on raising awareness of the health benefits and significance of sports. In this conversation, we will look to identify other mechanisms alongside education that influence and potentially change people’s habits and facilitate an active lifestyle. Is it possible to create an urban environment that would encourage in various ways both children and adults to embrace physical activities like cycling, jogging, walking instead of driving/riding, and exercising? What would this city look like? And, conversely, what kind of city promotes inactivity? What, in comparison with big cities, are the advantages and drawbacks of small towns and villages in terms of keeping yourself in shape? What are the factors that encourage young adults and grownups take up physical activities and how significant is free sports practice for children and teenagers in developing a taste for movement?

This time around, the participants in the conversation will explore health from the perspective of architecture, urban planning, grassroots sports and population involvement and discuss whether an (urban) environment could exist that would not only promote physical activities among its residents but also lessen the impact of social inequity.

About the contributors

Anna Žabicka is a social anthropologist who is currently writing her PhD thesis on aging and care in the Latvian countryside, basing it on a long-term ethnographic research carried out in a small Latvian countryside care home. Anna is specialising in medical anthropology: her principal academic focus is on the subjects of aging, care, health and social inequity, death and kinship. A holder of two MA degrees in social anthropology from Wayne State University (USA, 2019) and Riga Stradiņš University (2014), Anna Žabicka is currently studying toward a doctoral degree at the University of Vienna and teaching anthropology of medicine, death and kinship at Riga Stradiņš University.

Matīss Šteinerts is a practising architect and social anthropologist focusing on urban anthropology; the range of his interests includes analysis of the urban planning situation; alternative food provision in the city; roadside memorials and the right to the city. Matīss has studied in Latvia and the USA and is currently a lecturer at the Faculty of Architecture of Riga Technical University and the Social Anthropology Programme at Riga Stradiņš University.

Rolands Kikors is the President of the Latvian Street Workout and Calisthenics Federation. Professionally, Rolands is a lawyer, Head of the Legal and AML Department of the Swiss Dukascopy Bank SA group. In his free time, he stays actively involved in sports freestyle and Greco-Roman wrestling, CrossFit and street workout, which is an officially recognised sport in Latvia since the spring of 2019.

The MHM series of conversations is centred around discussions on the notion of health. Our health is a multi-layered and variable experience that is influenced by a number of factors, not always medical ones. In our conversations we will explore subjects like health inequity and inequality, stigmatisation of diseases and the influence of the urban environment and loneliness on our health. As part of the series, joined by experts of medical and social sciences and medical professionals, we will address subjects like health inequity in Latvia; the place of narcotic substance users in the society and their access to healthcare; the influence of urban environment on health behaviour, nutrition and food chains, as well as loneliness, sexual health and sexuality.

The MHM conversation series is supported by Friedrich Ebert Foundation.

The event at the museum can be attended exclusively by persons presenting a valid Covid-19 vaccination or recovery certificate and an identity document. Prior to the event, please register at the museum’s information centre.

Live stream of the event can be accessed on the MHM Facebook account here. The recording of the conversation is available on our Youtube channel.

Mvm Sarunas Prieksmets—2 Final
Faience mineral water mugs. Karlsbaden (Karlovi Vari), 1930s.
FacebookTwitter

At 18.00 in the garden or the conference hall of the Medicine History Museum. Participation in the workshop is free of charge by registering on the website here or by phone 26644548. It is often difficult to navigate the vast amount of information to understand what diet is healthy for children and which products are better to choose so that the child’s growing body receives all the necessary nutrients. The workshop will be led by nutritionist Veronika Avdejeva who will introduce us to the school children’s menu – the basic principles of its formation, how parents and the educational institution can influence the child’s eating habits and promote healthy choices, as well as basic principles that make everyday meals easier. During the lesson, special attention will be paid to the evaluation of the composition of food products, thus promoting an understanding of their nutritional value, which will help to choose the healthiest product alternative when shopping. Participants will be able to participate in a healthy nutrition workshop – prepare and taste snacks with healthy ingredients and get inspiration for different recipes to try in their daily lives. Veronika Avdejeva is a nutritionist. Educated at Riga Stradiņš University. On a daily basis, Veronika conducts nutrition classes and master classes for both children and adults and continues to study nutrition for a master’s degree. The class will be held in Latvian. The number of participants in the workshops is limited. The event will be photographed and the photos taken during it will be published in the post about the event on the internet as well as used for publicity of the project. Workshop attendees, except for children under 12 years of age, must present a COVID certificate confirming vaccination or recovery from Covid-19, or a negative test result. Classes are organised by Pauls Stradiņš Medicine History Museum in cooperation with SIA “OnPlate”. “MHM nutrition workshops for families” are implemented by European Social Fund project No. 9.2.4.1/16/I/001 “Complex health promotion and disease prevention measures”.
Vm Esf Lv Korigets
Darbnica—2—plakatswww
FacebookTwitter

On 24 August 2021 at 18:00, Pauls Stradiņš Museum of the History of Medicine is hosting the third event of the MHM Conversations series, ‘To punish or not to punish? Harm reduction approach to work with drug users’ that can also be viewed live on the MHM Facebook account. Social anthropologist Anna Žabicka, Head of Narcological Assistance Service at Riga Centre for Psychiatry and Narcology Astrīda Stirna and Chair of Board of DIA+LOGS support centre Ruta Kaupe will discuss the shortcomings and challenges of the current health and social policy regarding drug users.

Harm reduction is a body of measures that aim to reduce or avert the negative consequences and risks of drug use (for instance, infectious diseases, substance overdoses, etc.). As part of the harm reduction programme, people suffering from drug abuse disorders are provided with assistance to facilitate safer use of narcotic substances, given that these persons are subject to addiction and not always capable of taking care of themselves; that includes access to sanitary and hygiene products, testing for infectious diseases, and syringe exchange programmes. Furthermore, this approach emphasises the right of drug users to healthcare and is an effort to minimise stigmatisation.

Should people be punished for using narcotic substances? What contributes to the stigmatisation of drug users? And how does it affect their recovery? How accessible and harm-reduction-oriented is the current health and social support policy toward drug users in Latvia? What type of services should we be aiming to introduce? This time, the participants in the conversation will discuss the shortcomings and challenges of the health and social policy toward drug users.

About the contributors

Anna Žabicka is a social anthropologist who is currently writing her PhD thesis on aging and care in the Latvian countryside, basing it on a long-term ethnographic research carried out in a small Latvian countryside care home. Anna is specialising in medical anthropology: her principal academic focus is on the subjects of aging, care, health and social inequity, death and kinship. A holder of two MA degrees in social anthropology from Wayne State University (USA, 2019) and Riga Stradiņš University (2014), Anna Žabicka is currently studying toward a doctoral degree at the University of Vienna and teaching anthropology of medicine, death and kinship at Riga Stradiņš University.

Astrīda Stirna is Head of Narcological Assistance Service at Riga Centre for Psychiatry and Narcology, a healthcare management doctor, an experienced psychiatrist and narcologist, as well as Head Narcologist of the Ministry of Health.

Ruta Kaupe is the Chair of Board of the DIA+LOGS association, a support centre for people affected by HIV/AIDS. Ruta has a wealth of experience organising efforts of eliminating discrimination and working with socially marginalised people: users of narcotic substances, HIV positive people and AIDS patients, sex workers, their families and acquaintances.

The MHM series of conversations is centred around discussions on the notion of health. Our health is a multi-layered and variable experience that is influenced by a number of factors, not always medical ones. In our conversations we will explore subjects like health inequity and inequality, stigmatisation of diseases and the influence of the urban environment and loneliness on our health. As part of the series, joined by experts of medical and social sciences and medical professionals, we will address subjects like health inequity in Latvia; the place of narcotic substance users in the society and their access to healthcare; the influence of urban environment on health behaviour, nutrition and food chains, as well as loneliness, sexual health and sexuality.

The MHM conversation series is supported by Friedrich Ebert Foundation.

The event at the museum can be attended exclusively by persons presenting a valid Covid-19 vaccination or recovery certificate and an identity document. The number of free spots is limited, thus, starting from 20th of August, please register in advance by calling 26644548.

Live stream of the event can be accessed on the MHM Facebook account here. The recording of the conversation is available on our Youtube channel.

Mvm Sarunas Prieksmets—3 2 Final
Morphine and opium preparations, Germany, 1930s
FacebookTwitter